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Cmoran1205
How to pass HL ?

So I've always been relatively good at maths and I know myself I'm capable of doing higher level but I really havent put that much work into it over the last two years and now I'm just looking for a pass and hopefully a H5 . Any tips for me on how I can do this ?


13 Comments
mathspoints
If it was me and I had very little done I would grab my papers and a phone (with access to all of the solutions) and start making your way through them as best you can. There is very little on the syllabus that has not been asked in the past (though there are a couple of things) and so use your papers as a bible that will contain most of what you need to know and remember.
mathspoints
Grab a couple of different coloured pens for writing notes in the margins (you can look back over these notes the days leading up to the exam). Pick a colour for things you need to learn off by heart (eg cuts the x axis when y=0, rational inequalities multiply both sides by the square of the denominator etc), a colour for correction, a colour to take note of something you just do not get (even with the marking scheme). You can then ask your teacher, or post here looking for a more detailed solution. Obviously colour is optional but will you really pay attention to anything if you open up the papers and you just have mountains of red pen everywhere? Short questions take 10 minutes so give yourself 30 minutes to do 3...and then look at the marking scheme, taking notes and making corrections). Make good use of your time by NOT spending ages on stuff you know. If Q2 (a) is a 3 variable simultaneous and you KNOW how to do them....make note of that and move on. Check the solution and if you THOUGHT you knew and DIDN'T then go and do that question out. The reality is that if you are fairly good at Maths you still need to know so much off by heart...not proofs...but little one liners that will get you started. Taking note of these is vital...rather than JUST doing papers...
wasCF
wasCF
Learn how to use a calculator properly. This will save you so much time and you can actually abuse the device to help you with many of the problems (you can input some stuff into the calculator that you don't understand and it will tell you whether you're right or not). Get used to the Section B questions, being familiar with them can get you half the marks without knowing much maths. Learn Algebra, Calculus, Trig, Financial Maths, Co- Geometry and Prob: they will be handy for marks. You have plenty of time, of course you can get the grade with not much work at all(3 hours a week or so).
LC19letsgo
@mathspoints what kind of 'one liners' do you mean? thanks for your advice.
mathspoints
Well the wording will be different for everyone as the idea is that you make (and learn) these yourself. To solve rational inequalities multiply both sides by the square of the denominator. To find the common ratio of a geometric sequence divide the second term by the first term. To x=k is a root, then x-k is a factor To find the angle made by a line with the horizontal find the tan inverse of the slope of the line. To find the max and min of a function, differentiate the function, let equal to 0 and solve for x. To show that a function is always increasing, prove that its derivative is positive. Just a few off the top of my head but that's what I meant by knowing your one liners. Like if you don't know these the problem solving aspect of questions is almost irrelevant ...as you can't get anything started.
cormacpjk00
There are generally some very standard questions on Paper 1 that you can attain marks very easily. These questions are usual at the very start of the paper and usually just involve relatively standard algebra equations (there really isn't that much variation). Also attempt to answer at least the first two parts of each question as these questions are generally very simple and very standard and almost 50% of the marks go for them. For Paper 2, learn off all the material that requires learning off (theorems, trig proofs & constructions etc). In question that requires some sort of situation into a diagram, draw out a bunch of shapes and you'll pick up a few marks just for identifying the odd triangle.
cormacpjk00
^*that puts some sort of real life
LC19letsgo
thanks . This is really helpful !
ciara.manning.16
focus on section A questions as these are more straightforward than section B and the skills form the foundation for the applications. learn the learned material for paper 2 and definitely learn how to use your calculator properly for tabole functions, statistics, probablity, that sort of thing. at least attempt the first few parts of every question and try to stick to timing (spent half the amount of time as the number of marks going for the question- 30 mark q= 15 mins approx. after that, practice is your friend, the more recent papers being the biggest indicator of the types of q's that'll be asked.
Nihaar14
Nihaar14
focus on the following: - Practise the stuff that you know very well - Answer past exam papers thoroughly few times - Apply the basic principles likeTrig ratios and angles and understand them - Questions are long and answer is quite easy/short, so understand question first very well, more than likely just applyingbasics
wasCF
wasCF
ciara, I don't agree. Section B questions rely on common sense as much as it does on your maths. Absolutely, focus on Section B ones as much as the Section A ones. The first parts of the Section B ones are usually really easy, but usually get progressively harder as you go along. Do not stall on a question, if you don't know how to do a part of a question within one minute, skip. You'd have loads of time at the end to then dedicate to these questions. I feel in general that timing is very fair in Maths, but it can go disastrously if you don't approach it properly (one could finish the paper in 1.25 hours if they know the answer to every question straight away.) Of course, this could not be the case of anyone (me included), but just do all the easy parts really quickly so you could then have plenty of time to thinking about how to do the hard parts. Knowing how to use a calculator and your mathematical instruments is so important in getting those done quickly. Play around with the calculator, it can do many things that you wouldn't have thought to be possible (like storing data).
aclarke13
aclarke13
Drop to pass.
cpasley096
pass recommended
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