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141 Videos & Notes
  • Inside The Digestive System
    'The Journey of the Digestive System' by National Geographic
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  • How Evolution works
    The mechanisms of evolution explained in one video.
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  • The Electron: Crash Course Chemistry #5
    Hank brings us the story of the electron and describes how reality is a kind of music, discussing electron shells and orbitals, electron configurations, ionization and electron affinities, and how all these things can be understood via the periodic table. Crash Course on the internet! http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse http://TheCrashCourse.tumblr.com Table of Contents Snobby Scientists 00:43 Great Dane/Bohr Model 01:57 Electrons as Music 04:13 Electron Shells and Orbitals 04:44 Electron Configurations 05:54 Ionization and Electron Affinities 08:17 Periodic Table 10:18 Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
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  • The Periodic Table: Crash Course Chemistry #4
    Hank gives us a tour of the most important table ever, including the life story of the obsessive man who championed it, Dmitri Mendeleev. The periodic table of elements is a concise, information-dense catalog of all of the different sorts of atoms in the universe, and it has a wealth of information to tell us if we can learn to read it. Like Crash Course? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Follow Crash Course! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumbl Crash Course: http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Table of Contents Dmitri Mendeleev - 0:45 Mendeleev's Organization of the Periodic Table - 2:31 Relationships in the Periodic Table - 5:03 Why Mendeleev Stood Out from his Colleagues - 7:09 How the Periodic Table Could be Improved - 8:28 More info. about the cylindrical periodic table of elements: http://www.av8n.com/physics/periodic-table.htm Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
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  • Bell in a Bell Jar
    A bell can be heard ringing within a bell jar. The bell jar is connected to a vacuum pump and the air is slowly removed. Once a vacuum has been achieved the pumped is turned off and air is allowed to slowly re-enter the bell jar.
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  • Pollution: Crash Course Ecology #11
    Hank talks about the last major way humans are impacting the environment in this penultimate episode of Crash Course Ecology. Pollution takes many forms - from the simplest piece of litter to the more complex endocrine distruptors - and ultimately, humans are responsible for it all.
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  • Pollution: Crash Course Ecology #11
    Hank talks about the last major way humans are impacting the environment in this penultimate episode of Crash Course Ecology. Pollution takes many forms - from the simplest piece of litter to the more complex endocrine distruptors - and ultimately, humans are responsible for it all.
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  • The NEW Periodic Table Song (Updated)
    Download on ITUNES: http://bit.ly/12AeW99 Hey friends - we wanted to update a few things in our video to be more accurate and appropriate for everyone. And why not try and memorize this song all over again?! Thanks for all your support through the years, and we hope to make more songs like this soon. Sincerely, Mitch and Greg of AsapSCIENCE DOWNLOAD ON BANDCAMP: http://bit.ly/111Kssd (instrumental available) Get the AsapSCIENCE Book! http://asapscience.com/book FOLLOW US! Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube AsapINSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/asapscience/ Facebook: http://facebook.com/AsapSCIENCE Twitter: http://twitter.com/AsapSCIENCE Tumblr: http://asapscience.tumblr.com Vine: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine! SNAPCHAT 'whalewatchmeplz' and 'pixelmitch' Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. Box 93, Toronto P Toronto, ON, M5S2S6 ------------------------------------------ Written, Directed, Produced, Edited and Sung by Mitchell Moffit. Based on the "Can-Can" music, by Offenbach. LYRICS: There's Hydrogen and Helium Then Lithium, Beryllium Boron, Carbon everywhere Nitrogen all through the air With Oxygen so you can breathe And Fluorine for your pretty teeth Neon to light up the signs Sodium for salty times Magnesium, Aluminium, Silicon Phosphorus, then Sulfur, Chlorine and Argon Potassium, and Calcium so you'll grow strong Scandium, Titanium, Vanadium and Chromium and Manganese CHORUS This is the Periodic Table Noble gas is stable Halogens and Alkali react agressively Each period will see new outer shells While electrons are added moving to the right Iron is the 26th Then Cobalt, Nickel coins you get Copper, Zinc and Gallium Germanium and Arsenic Selenium and Bromine film While Krypton helps light up your room Rubidium and Strontium then Yttrium, Zirconium Niobium, Molybdenum, Technetium Ruthenium, Rhodium, Palladium Silver-ware then Cadmium and Indium Tin-cans, Antimony then Tellurium and Iodine and Xenon and then Caesium and... Barium is 56 and this is where the table splits Where Lanthanides have just begun Lanthanum, Cerium and Praseodymium Neodymium's next too Promethium, then 62's Samarium, Europium, Gadolinium and Terbium Dysprosium, Holmium, Erbium, Thulium Ytterbium, Lutetium Hafnium, Tantalum, Tungsten then we're on to Rhenium, Osmium and Iridium Platinum, Gold to make you rich till you grow old Mercury to tell you when it's really cold Thallium and Lead then Bismuth for your tummy Polonium, Astatine would not be yummy Radon, Francium will last a little time Radium then Actinides at 89 REPEAT CHORUS Actinium, Thorium, Protactinium Uranium, Neptunium, Plutonium Americium, Curium, Berkelium Californium, Einsteinium, Fermium Mendelevium, Nobelium, Lawrencium Rutherfordium, Dubnium, Seaborgium Bohrium, Hassium then Meitnerium Darmstadtium, Roentgenium, Copernicium Ununtrium, Flerovium Ununpentium, Livermorium Ununseptium, Ununoctium And then we're done!!
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  • Blood - What Is Blood - Primary Functions Of Blood
    In this video I discuss what is blood, the primary functions of blood, and what is blood made of. I also discuss the components of blood, what does blood do, and the functions of blood cells. Transcript What is blood? Well, blood is made up of 4 major components, plasma, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Plasma makes up about 50 to 55% of blood, and its main contents include, about 90% water, glucose, hormones, enzymes, proteins, minerals and various waste products like carbon dioxide. Red blood cells make up about 45 to 50% of blood, and their primary function is to carry oxygen to cells and deliver carbon dioxide to lungs. White blood cells make up 1-2% of blood, and they help protect the body against disease and invaders. Platelets make up 1 to 2% of blood, and they are involved in clotting and help prevent bleeding. Blood has 3 major functions in the body. 1. Transportation Blood transports oxygen and other various nutrients to cells throughout the body, it also carries waste products and carbon dioxide to the kidneys and lungs for removal from the body. 2. Protection Blood carries white blood cells which fight infections that threaten to damage the body. 3. Regulation Blood regulates body temperature, as well as ph balance. Other sources... http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/196001.php
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  • Circulatory System - Cardiovascular System - Path Of Blood Flow
    In this video I discuss the circulatory system or cardiovascular system, the functions of the cardiovascular system and the path of blood flow through the heart and components of the cardiovascular system. Transcript (partial with notes) The circulatory system is responsible for transporting nutrients, such as, hormones, water, oxygen and other nutrients to and from virtually all cells throughout the body. It also carries away carbon dioxide and other waste materials produced by cells. The cardiovascular system is made up of the heart, vessels, which include arteries, veins and capillaries. Let’s look at the path of nutrients though the body… 1st, Oxygen is absorbed in the lungs, where it enters the bloodstream and goes to the heart, which pumps it into arteries. Arteries take the oxygenated material to organs and tissues, where they merge into capillaries. Many capillaries enter tissue to form a capillary bed. The oxygenated material drops off its nutrients, and collects waste materials such as carbon dioxide. This deoxygenated waste continues through the capillary which merge into veins. The veins then take the waste to the heart, which pumps it back to the lungs where it can get oxygenated again.
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  • Respiratory System - How The Respiratory System Works
    In this video I discuss the basics of the Respiratory System, including how the respiratory system works, I go through the breathing process, and show how breathing works. Transcript We are going to look at the functions of the respiratory system, its components, how the system works, and some things you can do to maintain a healthy respiratory system. The respiratory system’s main functions include, transporting air into and out of the lungs, protecting the body against harmful particles that are inhaled, and it’s most important function, the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. So, its basically about breathing. Now lets take a look at a diagram and we will go through The respiratory systems main components. Starting here with the nose and nasal cavity, the mouth or oral cavity, the pharynx is here and it what we consider the throat. The pharynx is considered part of the digestive system as well as the respiratory system, and it connects the respiratory openings to the larynx and esophagus. The esophagus is not part of the respiratory system, and I will get to why I put it in the diagram in a minute. Next we have the larynx, also called the voice box because the vocal cords are located here. The trachea also called the windpipe, is here, and it connects to the bronchi, which merge into smaller tubes called bronchioles. And, the bronchioles connect to tiny air sacs called alveoli. And then down here is the diaphragm. Now lets go through a very basic look at what happens during the breathing process. So, air is breathed in through the nose or mouth. When it enters through the nose, it gets spread out by these shelf-like things here called conchae. The conchae help humidify the air, and trap some inhaled particles. They also warm the air. The air next passes through the pharynx and enters the trachea. One note here. This little flap like structure is called the epiglottis and it has an important function. During breathing it is pointed upward allowing airflow into the trachea, however, during swallowing it folds down to prevent food from going into the trachea, directing the food into the esophagus. If food does enter the trachea, the gag reflex is induced to protect the respiratory system. The epiglottis here, this little thing shows you how amazing the human body is. Anyways, back to air flow. So, air continues down the trachea and enters the bronchi. From there it enters into smaller bronchioles, and finally into the alveoli, which are surrounded by a network of capillaries. And this folks is where the magic happens. Oxygen enters the alveolar sac and the gas exchange occurs. Capillaries give up their waste carbon dioxide, and pick up the oxygen. Carbon dioxide is then exhaled through the air passage the oxygen was inhaled through, and the oxygen picked up by the blood returns to the heart. During this breathing process the diaphragm is busy as well, contracting as we breath in, which allow the lungs to expand, and relaxing as we exhale. Some minor respiratory disorders include, the common cold, influenza, acute bronchitis, which is inflammation of the bronchi, and pneumonia, which is inflammation of the bronchioles and alveoli. Some of the more damaging disorders include, chronic bronchitis, where the bronchi become inflamed and narrowed, mainly caused by tobacco smoke, emphysema, where the alveoli become overstretched, and lung cancer, which in almost 9 of 10 cases is caused by tobacco smoke. What can you do to maintain or improve respiratory system health? Maintian a healthy weight, excess weight compresses respiratory muscles and puts more stress on your lungs. Drink plenty of water, dehydration can cause the mucus lining your airways to thicken and become sticky, making you more susceptible to illness. Consume foods rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, such as fruits, veggies and nuts, which can help to reduce inflammation and fight oxidative damage. Limit exposure to common allergens such as dust mites, pollen and animal dander. Maintain good hygiene, many respiratory viruses are transmitted because of bad hygiene and poor hand washing. Don’t over consume alcohol, it dehydrates the body and weakens the immune system. Get more active, regular aerobic activity can help our respiratory system. Add indoor plants, plants have been shown to help improve air quality. Bottom line. As you can see the respiratory system has a major impact on overall health, as you may already know, breathing is kind of important. So, eat a healthy diet, maintain an active lifestyle, and keep up good hygiene.
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  • Digestive System - How The Digestive System Works - Digestive System Function
    In this video I discuss how the digestive system works, digestive system functions, and the components of the digestive system. I also discuss the path of food through the digestive system. Transcript with notes Bryan here, and in this video we are going to look at the digestive system. Now let’s take a look at a diagram and we will go through the digestive systems main components. Starting here with the mouth and salivary glands, which lead to the pharynx, or what we call the throat. Next we have the esophagus here, which connects to the stomach. The liver is here, along with the gallbladder and the pancreas is back here. Down here is the small intestine which has 3 sections, the doudenum, the jejunum, and the ileum. The large intestine is here, and it also has 3 sections, the cecum, colon and rectum, and the anus is here. Now let’s go through a very basic look at what happens during the digestive process or the path of food, as well as the digestive system functions. So, food enters the mouth, where we chew it up. The salivary glands produce saliva, which helps lubricate the food. The saliva also contains digestive enzymes that begin breaking down the food. The food is then swallowed through the pharynx or throat, and passes into the esophagus. From the esophagus, food enters the stomach. Here, food is churned and mixed with gastric juices to form chyme, which is a soupy like mix. The gastric juices include digestive enzymes and hydrochloric acid, which helps breakdown food further, and also kills potentially harmful bacteria. There is a ring of muscle near the end of the stomach that is called the pyloric sphincter. This muscle opens at intervals to allow small quantities of the chyme to enter into the first part of the small intestine the duodenum. Small quantities are released to avoid overwhelming the small intestines digestive processes. In the duodenum, the breakdown of food, or chyme continues with the help of enzymes from the pancreas and bile that is produced by the liver and stored in the gallbladder. The path of food continues into the 2nd section of the small intestine, the jejunum, and folks, this is where the magic happens. The inner lining of the small intestine is covered by tiny finger like projections called villi. These villi give the small intestine a huge surface area to allow for efficient absorption of nutrients. Nutrients pass into the interior of a villus. Inside each villus is a tiny lymph capillary, and a blood capillary. Here, Glucose and amino acids, or carbohydrates and proteins, as well as other nutrients are absorbed into the blood capillaries, and transported to the liver for processing. Fats are absorbed into the lymph capillary and transported to the liver by way of the lymphatic duct and circulatory system. Once the breakdown and absorption is complete in the small intestine, the waste product that remains from this process is partially digested, liquefied food. This passes from the last part of the small intestine called the ileum, through the ileocecal valve, into the 1st part of the large intestine called the cecum. From there, it enters the 2nd part of the large intestine called the colon. Here, sodium, chloride and water are absorbed through the lining of the colon, into the bloodstream, helping convert the liquid food or chyme into semisolid feces. At the end of the colon is the 3rd part of the large intestine, the rectum, which stores feces, and contracts to expel them through the anus. And that completes the journey of food through the digestive system, and how the digestive system functions. Alright, if you have any questions or comments you can leave them below, if you like the video hit thumbs up, if I just wasted your time hit the thumbs down…til next time, I’m out, see ya.
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  • Hoffman Electrolysis Demonstration Apparatus
    Watch as the Flinn Scientific Staff demonstrates the Hoffman Electrolysis Demonstration Apparatus. To view more See It In Action videos by Flinn Scientific visit us at http://www.flinnsci.com/teacher-resources/teacher-resource-videos/see-it-in-action-videos/ ATTENTION: This demonstration is intended for and should only be performed by certified science instructors in a safe laboratory/classroom setting.
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  • EarthBootCamp_4.7A_AC
    Science Investigation 2016 - Biology
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  • Energy, Work and Power
    Mr. Andersen defines the terms energy, work and power. He also uses a simple example to calculate both work and power. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
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  • How To: Find Density/Mass/Volume (EASY equation w/ practice problems)
    A video made by a student, for a student. Showing how to find density/mass/volume of an object using a simple equation. Kansas University. Rock Chalk Jayhawk, KU!!!!!!!!! IGNORE: Stoichiometry. Biology. Chemistry. How to work practice problem. How to convert. moles to grams . grams to moles. how to. doing chemistry practice problems. science. how. to. do. science. intro college chemistry level. problems. molecular weight. neutrality. acid. base. calculations. molar. mole. molar unit. grams. weight. chemical. formula. empirical. molecular. science equations. easy problems worked. made easier. made easy. density. mass. volume. how to find them. finding density. finding volume. finding mass. how to find molarity. how to find molecular weight of anything! all chemistry equations keywords
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  • Exp: Preparation of Oxygen gas.
    Prepared by the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide using the catalyst manganese (IV) oxide.
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